Nikau Hindin
Salome Tanuvasa
Sam Kelly
Tyler Jackson

29 August – 28 September 2019




Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin Salome Tanuvasa Sam Kelly Tyler Jackson

Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Tyler Jackson

Tyler Jackson. No title, 2019. Thermoformed acrylic glass, aluminium & lacquer. 800 x 800 x 350mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Salome Tanuvasa

Salome Tanuvasa. Untitled, 2019. Calico, linen, cotton, brass eyelets & cotton threads. 800 x 950mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin

Nikau Hindin. Arorangi, 2019. Pigment and aute. 770 x 440mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

A bit more like this, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin Salome Tanuvasa Sam Kelly Tyler Jackson

Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Tyler Jackson

Tyler Jackson. No title, 2019. Thermoformed acrylic glass, aluminium & lacquer. 1000 x 1300 x 250mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

I got you, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin

Nikau Hindin. Pō Ngārahu II, 2019. Pigment and aute. 410 x 220mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin Salome Tanuvasa Sam Kelly Tyler Jackson

Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Salome Tanuvasa

Salome Tanuvasa, install.



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin

Nikau Hindin. Pō Ngārahu I & II, 2019. Pigment and aute. 410 x 220mm each



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

A bit more that way, Where you going? 2018. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Tyler Jackson

Tyler Jackson. No title, 2019. Thermoformed acrylic glass, aluminium & lacquer. 1000 x 1300 x 250mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

Choose someone in the room to partner up with, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Salome Tanuvasa

Salome Tanuvasa. Untitled, 2019. Calico, linen, cotton, brass eyelets & cotton threads. 800 x 950mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

Imagine you’re a totem, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin

Nikau Hindin. Pō Ngārahu I, 2019. Pigment and aute. 410 x 220mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Salome Tanuvasa

Salome Tanuvasa. Untitled, 2019. Calico, linen, cotton, brass eyelets & cotton threads. 800 x 950mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

Bit further, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin Salome Tanuvasa Sam Kelly Tyler Jackson

Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Sam Kelly

Up and down, but not quite, 2019. Cow bone, steel, glue



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Tyler Jackson

Tyler Jackson. No title, 2019. Thermoformed acrylic glass, aluminium & lacquer. 800 x 800 x 350mm



Millers O'Brien Wellington Art Gallery Nikau Hindin Salome Tanuvasa Sam Kelly Tyler Jackson

This new exhibition brings together 4 emerging New Zealand-based artists who share a devotion to texture, mark making and materiality. Nikau Hindin is reawakening the process of making aute, Māori tapa cloth, and mapping the Stars, Salome Tanuvasa’s simple instinctive line drawings are rendered in fabric, Sam Kelly translates familiar and intricate textures into cow bone, and Tyler Jackson manipulates acrylic sheets to challenge our perceptions of light and colour.

Sam Kelly, originally from Wellington, now resides in Taranaki with her husband and three boys where she co-owns a contemporary jewellery workshop/gallery — the jewel and the jeweller. Sam has a Bachelor of Applied Art from Whitireia NZ. She has primarily been making jewellery from bone for the last 12 years and has only started exploring larger scale bone sculptures in the last year. Sam was selected for the prestigious Talente, Munich, in 2011 and interned with Atelier Ted Noten in 2013. Sam has exhibited in New Zealand, Australia and Munich.

Tyler Jackson is a Wellington/Te Whanganui-a-Tara based emerging artist, curator and facilitator at play_station ARI. He graduated with a Bachelor of Fine Arts with first class honours from Massey University in 2016. During his study, Jackson was the recipient of the NZ Art Show’s R T Nelson NZ Emerging Artist award. Tyler’s practice explores the idea of seeing light and space and the aesthetic intrinsic relationship between industrial minimalist materiality versus the immateriality of light and colour. Recent projects include: 2019; Courtship (with Robbie Handcock), Auckland Art Fair, 2019; Waiheke Sculpture on the Gulf, Auckland, 2019; Between the beach and the lounge, Biquini Wax EPS, Mexico City, 2018; Traces: the part encodes the whole, [tacit] gallery, Hamilton, 2018: Modulators | Reliefs, Precinct 35, Wellington, 2017 & Light – Space Corridor, play_station, Wellington, 2017 & Light – Space Corridor, play_station, Wellington, 2017.

Salome Tanuvasa graduated with a Masters of Fine Art from Elam School of Fine Art, in 2014 after completing her first year of study at Manukau School of Visual Art. In 2012 and 2013 she was awarded the NICAI Summer Scholarship working under Fiona Jack on the Rosebank Art Walk and Jim Speers on a project in Shanghai. As well as much academic and exhibition success Salome has held mentoring roles for Tuākana, The University of Auckland and Nga Rangitahi Toa. In 2016 she was the Artspace/Tautai education intern, she was then the Education Coordinator at Te Tuhi and she has just started a new role as a high school art teacher. Salome's work crosses a variety of mediums, most notably drawing, textiles and painting. Her work is influenced by her immediate surrounding and the environments she is in at the time.

Nikau Hindin, Ngāpuhi and Te Rarawa, has recently returned from Hawai'i where she studied under tohunga (masters) in the traditional art of making Hawaiian kapa (tapa). Applying what she learned from these tohunga, she is looking to revive a contemporary form a Māori art largely lost after the extinction of the aute plant in Aotearoa. Her approach to mark making is also drawn from te ao Māori, considering what marks might reflect Māori systems of knowledge and drawing upon celestial navigation, i.e. the Star Compass.